Medicare & Social Security Deductions

If you receive monthly Social Security benefits, your Medicare premiums can be automatically deducted from your Social Security check. The amount of the deduction depends on which Medicare plans you have and your income.

Terry Turner, writer and researcher for RetireGuide
  • Written by
    Terry Turner

    Terry Turner

    Senior Financial Writer and Financial Wellness Facilitator

    Terry Turner has more than 30 years of journalism experience, including covering benefits, spending and congressional action on federal programs such as Social Security and Medicare. He is a Certified Financial Wellness Facilitator through the National Wellness Institute and the Foundation for Financial Wellness and a member of the Association for Financial Counseling & Planning Education (AFCPE®).

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    Lamia Chowdhury
    Lamia Chowdhury, editor for RetireGuide.com

    Lamia Chowdhury

    Financial Editor

    Lamia Chowdhury is a financial content editor for RetireGuide and has over three years of marketing experience in the finance industry. She has written copy for both digital and print pieces ranging from blogs, radio scripts and search ads to billboards, brochures, mailers and more.

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  • Reviewed By
    Christian Worstell
    Christian Worstell, Medicare expert

    Christian Worstell

    Medicare Expert

    Christian Worstell is a licensed health insurance agent and an established writer in the sector, with articles featured in Forbes, MarketWatch, WebMD and more. His work has positively impacted beneficiaries nationwide and empowers them to make strong health care decisions.

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  • Published: January 13, 2023
  • Updated: January 24, 2023
  • 6 min read time
  • This page features 5 Cited Research Articles
Fact Checked
Fact Checked

A licensed insurance professional reviewed this page for accuracy and compliance with the CMS Medicare Communications and Marketing Guidelines (MCMGs) and Medicare Advantage (MA/MAPD) and/or Medicare Prescription Drug Plans (PDP) carriers’ guidelines.

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How to Cite RetireGuide.com's Article

APA Turner, T. (2023, January 24). Medicare & Social Security Deductions. RetireGuide.com. Retrieved February 3, 2023, from https://www.retireguide.com/medicare/costs-and-coverage/social-security-deductions/

MLA Turner, Terry. "Medicare & Social Security Deductions." RetireGuide.com, 24 Jan 2023, https://www.retireguide.com/medicare/costs-and-coverage/social-security-deductions/.

Chicago Turner, Terry. "Medicare & Social Security Deductions." RetireGuide.com. Last modified January 24, 2023. https://www.retireguide.com/medicare/costs-and-coverage/social-security-deductions/.

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Key Takeaways
  • If you are receiving Social Security benefits, your Medicare Part B premiums will be automatically deducted from your monthly Social Security check.
  • If you have a Medicare Advantage or Medicare Part D drug plan, you can ask your plan administrator if your premiums can be deducted from your Social Security check.
  • If you are enrolled in Medicare but not drawing Social Security benefits, you can contact Medicare to have your monthly premiums automatically paid from your checking or savings account.

Medicare Deduction From Social Security 2023

Most people enrolled in Medicare — and receiving Social Security benefits — will have at least $164.90 deducted from their Social Security check each month in 2023.

This is the monthly premium for Medicare Part B. But some people will have more deducted from their Social Security benefits to cover other Medicare premiums.

You won’t receive a monthly bill for Medicare premiums from Social Security, but you will receive a monthly statement telling you how much will be deducted from your Social Security check.

You may also be able to have Medicare Advantage (Medicare Part C) and Medicare Part D prescription drug plan premiums deducted from your Social Security benefits.

Did You Know?
If you are enrolled in Medicare but not yet claiming Social Security benefits, you can sign up for Medicare Easy Pay — which will automatically withdraw your monthly premiums from your checking or savings account. Many Medicare Advantage, Medicare Part D and Medigap plans also allow members to have their premiums automatically deducted from their bank account.
Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Can Medicare Premiums Be Deducted Automatically From Social Security Checks?

While Medicare premiums can be deducted automatically, the amount withheld from your Social Security check each month depends on what Medicare plans you are enrolled in, whether you have to pay Medicare Part A premiums and your annual income.

Understanding the billing portion of your Medicare is almost as important as the coverage itself. Knowing if your Medicare premiums will be deducted from your Social Security check can help your benefits better fit into your budget.

Medicare Part A

Most people don’t have to pay Medicare Part A premiums. However, you have to pay Part A premiums if you have not paid Medicare taxes through your job for at least 10 years.

If you have to pay monthly Medicare Part A premiums, you can’t qualify for Social Security benefits. But you can still buy Medicare Part A if you don’t qualify for Social Security.

Cost of Medicare Part A Premiums, 2023
Time Worked Paying Medicare TaxesMonthly Premium Amount
Less than 30 quarters (7.5 years) $506
30 to 39 quarters (7.5–10 years)$278
Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Medicare Part B

If you have Medicare Part B medical insurance, your premiums are automatically deducted from your Social Security check and your monthly premiums are based on your income. Most Part B enrollees will have $164.90 deducted from their Social Security each month in 2023.

The amount increases if you have a high income. The amount of the premium, and the income level at which it increases, change each year.

Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C)

Medicare Advantage plans are sold through private insurers and replace Medicare Part A and Part B. In some cases, their premiums can also be deducted from your monthly Social Security benefits.

This won’t be automatic. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan you will have to contact your plan’s administrator to set it up. Some plans may not let you have the premiums deducted from your Social Security benefits.

The amount of the deduction varies from plan to plan — and there were roughly 4,000 plans available in the United States for 2023, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans

Medicare Part D prescription drug plans are sold through private insurers and premiums vary from plan to plan. Most Medicare Advantage plans include a Part D plan as well.

If you have a standalone Medicare Part D plan, you can contact the plan administrator to set up automatic deductions from your monthly Social Security check. Not all plans will allow you to set up automatic deductions.

Medigap (Medicare Supplement Insurance)

You typically cannot have your Medigap premiums deducted from your Social Security check.

Medigap — also called Medicare Supplement insurance — helps cover out-of-pocket Medicare costs such as copays, coinsurance and Medicare deductibles. These policies are sold through private insurers who bill you directly.

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Does Everyone on Social Security Pay for Medicare?

Medicare helps with your health care costs — but does not cover all medical expenses and does not cover long-term care. Most people still have to pay for Medicare if they are on Social Security.

One notable exception is that if you qualify for Social Security benefits you do not have to pay premiums for Medicare Part A when you turn 65. But you will still be responsible for deductibles and coinsurance or copays.

You will have to pay premiums and other out-of-pocket expenses for other parts of Medicare. Everyone who has Medicare Part B or a Medicare Advantage plan is responsible for their Medicare Part B premiums.

Medigap plans C and F cover the Part B annual deductibles, but only to those who became eligible before Jan. 1, 2020. However, these plans only cover the deductible, not the Part B premium.

Some Medicare Advantage plans may offer “give back benefits” to beneficiaries that “give back” some or all of the cost of the monthly Part B premium. These plans are not available in all areas.

Tip
You can contact the Social Security Administration online or by calling toll-free at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY at 1-800-325-0778). You can also find a local Social Security office using the SSA’s office locator tool to call and set up an appointment or speak with a local representative over the phone.

Medicare Deductions from Social Security FAQs

Are Medicare premiums tax deductible?
You can deduct your Medicare premiums if you opt out of the standard deduction, itemize your federal taxes and qualify for the medical expense deduction. To make it worthwhile, the total of all your qualified deductions should be higher than your standard deduction. But you can apply your Medicare Part A and Part B, Medicare Advantage, Medicare Part D and Medigap premiums toward your itemized deductions.
How much does Social Security take out for Medicare each month?
It varies from person to person and depends on which Medicare plans you have and how high your income is. But for most Medicare beneficiaries it will be at least $164.90 per month in 2023 if they have Medicare Part B coverage.
Is Medicare Part B automatically deducted from Social Security?
If you are receiving Social Security benefits you will automatically be enrolled in Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B when you become eligible. Because you have to pay for Medicare Part B premiums, you can opt out of it. If you do not, your Part B premiums will be automatically deducted from your monthly Social Security check.
Last Modified: January 24, 2023

5 Cited Research Articles

  1. Freed, M. et al. (2022, November 10). Medicare Advantage 2023 Spotlight: First Look. Retrieved from https://www.kff.org/medicare/issue-brief/medicare-advantage-2023-spotlight-first-look/
  2. Social Security National Press Office. (2022). Fact Sheet; 2023 Social Security Changes. Retrieved from https://www.ssa.gov/news/press/factsheets/colafacts2023.pdf
  3. Social Security Administration. (n.d.). Premiums: Rules for Higher-Income Beneficiaries. Retrieved from https://www.ssa.gov/benefits/medicare/medicare-premiums.html
  4. U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (n.d.). How To Pay Part A & Part B Premiums. Retrieved from https://www.medicare.gov/basics/costs/pay-premiums
  5. U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (n.d.). Medicare Easy Pay. Retrieved from https://www.medicare.gov/basics/costs/pay-premiums/medicare-easy-pay